Odysseus

Odysseus
Our Barge, Odysseus

Friday, September 17, 2010

Noise and Thunderstorms - Saarbrucken

We wanted to enjoy Saarbrucken. We really did.  They have a nice small art museum we visited (admission was 1.50 euros!), and like Germans everywhere, their blood runs thick with beer. Unfortunately, they placed their mooring spot for pleasure boats right across from the autobahn that runs through town which, because it is backed up by a big wall, makes the tie up unbearable noisy.
Not much traffic now but wait 'til later!

A German rowing club doing what Germans do.  Note the accordian player in the stern providing the entertainment.


The upshot was we only spent one night there and then about noon on Sunday after visiting the art gallery and taking in a classic car show across the river (beer for breakfast!), moved to the "Motor Boat Club Saar," just 2 k up the river. The people were very friendly and a couple of them enjoyed practicing their English with us.  They also offered a great side benefit, cheap beer!  They were providing us with the equivalent of a 15 oz bottle of Bittburger, one of our favorite German beers, for 1 euro! As the afternoon wore on, however, the clouds thickened and lowered and about 2:30 the heavens opened and a torrential downpour, complete with wind, thunder and lightening broke up the party.  We were thoroughly drenched.
One interesting thing we did learn before the downpour: in the distance of the mooring picture, you can see a very tall stack.  Here's a shot from the MBC Saar-

That is the city heating plant.  It is oil fired but the residents are very proud that it has won several "green" awards.  In the winter, steam is generated and shipped through pipes into the city. There are heat exchangers in the basements of the big building connected to radiators and major parts of the city are heated from this plant.
Monday morning we were off.  By afternoon we would be back in France.

1 comment:

scott davidson said...

What an interesting blog, introduced by a thought-provoking photo. The unusual wall painting of the dwellings is also a strangely modern interpretation. Something like this hieroglyphic view of a park by Swiss painter Paul Klee, http://EN.WahooArt.com/A55A04/w.nsf/OPRA/BRUE-8LT475.
The image can be seen at wahooart.com who can supply you with a canvas print of it.